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Triple Vision

On Triple Vision, hosts David Best and Hanna Leavitt bring you the history of Canadians who are blind, deafblind and partially sighted, one story at a time, illuminating the challenges of the past, present, and future.

Triple Vision

On Triple Vision, hosts David Best and Hanna Leavitt bring you the history of Canadians who are blind, deafblind and partially sighted, one story at a time, illuminating the challenges of the past, present, and future.

Recent episodes

From Homer to Stevie Wonder: Two-and-a-Half Centuries of the Single Story

Authored on January 24, 2023

"In this episode the Triple Vision team continues its exploration of the danger of a single story by speaking with Dr. M. Leona Godin.

Dr. Godin, who has taught literature and humanities at New York University, is a writer, performer and educator, lecturing on art, accessibility, technology, and disability. In this episode, she speaks with Peter Field and Hanna Leavitt about the themes emerging from her book, There Plant Eyes: A Personal and Cultural History of Blindness. She reflects on how some of the single stories of blindness over the past two-and-a-half centuries have led to myth, stereotyping and unbridled inspiration porn.

""I think the most obvious thing that I am pushing back on in my book is that the story of blindness in our literature, in our media, our films, and even from a journalistic perspective, has almost exclusively been told by sighted people. That is the No. 1 big issue, because I think that the ideas that sighted people have about blind people just don't make any sense in terms of our own lived experience.”

Learn more about There Plant Eyes: A Personal and Cultural History of Blindness: https://drmlgodin.com/2021/05/there-plant-eyes-a-personal-and-cultural-…"

The Danger of a Single Story

Authored on January 10, 2023

In this episode the Triple Vision team takes a page from a Ted Talk by Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie called “The Danger of a Single story”. In her Talk the author relates what happens when someone else tells the story about another person or a community, and how much they can get that story wrong. Throughout the podcast you will hear the voices of the Triple Vision team, David Best, Sharlyn Ayotte, Peter Field and Hanna Leavitt discussing how the story regarding the community of Canadians who are blind and visually impaired has been told for years without them, and what the consequences of that are.

“I was shocked by that. It was a story that had been generated for an awfully long time by the agency about who we were as blind people, dependent, helpless, terrified by everyday living. I couldn’t stay any longer because the story I knew about my friends and myself was that we were educated, self-determined, independent, skilled and talented.” The single story is a theme the Triple Vision team plans to return to often in its upcoming episodes.

Resources:
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, The Danger of a Single Story (2009): https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_ngozi_adichie_the_danger_of_a_sing…

The Triple Vision Podcast: Season 1 Round-up

Authored on September 27, 2022

"In this last episode of Triple Vision’s first season, the team of David, Hanna, Sharlyn and Peter look back at their first year of podcasting and some of their most memorable moments.

From Professor Serge Durflinger talking about his book, “Veterans with a Vision,” in Episode 1, to colonialism, library services and several episodes dedicated to education and employment, the team recalls what they learne and what they are looking forward to next as they prepare for a second season.

“I’m looking forward to a conversation that talks about how governance matters, and which narratives take priority when we are talking about ‘nothing about us without us,’ and how the current governance models are not working to support that perspective.”

“The challenge that we have is that we’re such a small group that a lot of what we say gets overlooked. Even today, we see that a lot of the traditional ways of doing things lingers on. We have to try to figure out how we can shift that thought process; for example, today we depend on computers, technology, the iPhone, everything like that, and it makes a huge difference in our lives. But, for the most part, we are basically told what we need. We’re not given much opportunity to say, 'I am the end user and this is what I want. This is how I do things.'”"